Minimalism (in general)

What do you think about minimalism? Minimalism definitely affects all aspects of life.

I realized how much I needed minimalism when I moved from one country to another. I’m definitely more of a conscious consumer thanks to it.

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Moving from one country to another changes your perspectives a lot. On my first visit ‘home’ after I moved, I took a suitcase full of books. Books I’ve read, books I like to have around, books I’ve opened once in the 7 years they have been with me.

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@tiffany
I totally get that sentiment.

I’m an aspiring minimalist, and am currently in the process of purging a lot of ‘junk’ that’s no longer needed/didn’t need in the first place.

Anything I don’t want/need will be donated to folks that will actually get use out of it.

My goal is always to have the mentality of “less is more”. It’s a strange concept during these modern times, though, isn’t it?

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You can’t simplify your life without understanding your own needs.
It feels great to want less.

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That’s very elegantly put @elegante, you’re right that really getting to know ourselves can encourage us to appreciate the simpler things in life.

It’s impossible to understand what’s truly important without first removing some of the things that might be distracting us or making us unable to evaluate who we are. When we want less, it means we are more content with the things we have, in the present moment.

We can find both beauty and comfort in simplicity.

One of the most liberating things about adopting a minimalistic view to life for me has been the freedom of knowing that I will be okay and comfortable even with nothing. It is a sense of lightness of being, an unencumbered feeling and a knowing that I can get by and trust myself to be okay just as my body. I think when we live in fear, or we live identified with needingsomething other than who we are at our most stripped down, our most essential and bare, if we are carrying the weight of attachment to all these possessions (or even feelings, thoughts, beliefs) as Who We Are, life is so tiring and heavy. We don’t remember how to trust ourselves, or connect with ourselves, because life is lived in a heavy, distorted way for the external and false satisfaction, the illusion of a security and comfort that always eludes us. Minimalism is piercing that veil, to start to allow in the possibility for more us, and less everything else. To allow for the possibility that maybe life can be simpler and more full of trust and comfort in being simple. And we find the freedom of that, and the joy any lightness of that, and come home to true comfort within that we never really needed all of that in the first place.