My dream mudita phone

Wish mudita had these:

  1. Some from access to emails (not a fully fledged email app, just notifications with sender’s name and subject.)
  2. A ride sharing app
  3. A dating app
  4. An SDK for personal development
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You have just described my nightmare Mudita phone.

Item 1 might be modestly convenient in some circumstances, but possibly defies the point of having the phone in the first place. It could perhaps prevent us landing right back in the notification trap, if it requires manual opening and checking.

Items 2 and 3 are my idea of utter hell, and such apps are generally produced by spammy low-quality developers who just want to harvest all the private data they can manage. Even if implemented in the most ethical way possible, the very existence of such apps for this phone would ruin my trust for it.

Item 4 exists already - the source for MuditaOS is already freely available for anyone to clone the repository and hack away.

It sounds like you’re really looking for an Android smartphone that’s a bit trimmed-down. Might I suggest you simply uninstall everything you don’t use from yours - and if you want the retro aesthetic, physical buttons, and even more trimmed-down features, consider getting a KaiOS device. I often use a Nokia 800 Tough, but if you want to be more stylish, you could try their 8110 4G, which would earn you hipster-points for it being the reboot of the phone from the Matrix.

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@ramgorur You’re Wishlist has intrigued me. I have to know why would you want it to have a dating app? I’m not playing devil’s advocate, I’m just sincerely curious.
Mudita Pure was created with the intention to enjoy life offline, to form meaningful human connections- in person. Why did a dating up make your top 4! Why not a GPS function, perhaps?

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While waiting for a Mudita cellphone that will handle group text-messages, which require MMS, I got a Sunbeam Wireless F1 Orchid – a flip phone with a privacy-focused OS built on AOSP.

I now have had the Orchid for about a month, and I love that its two dedicated “icon lights” on the cover mean that I don’t have to flip it open to see whether I got any calls (blue-lit missed-call icon) or messages (green-lit envelope icon).

Those two icon lights on the cover have trained me not to pick up the Orchid out of boredom while lying to myself that I need to see whether I missed anything. They truly are a brilliant feature (pun intended :wink:) of the Orchid. Granted, the red notification LED on many smartphones provides similar functionality (although not with missed-call-vs-missed-message specificity). But, the fact that the Orchid has no email client, no Web browser, and no app store reduces the temptation to open it thoughtlessly.

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I have a gps in my car already, lol, but yea that might be useful to some, didn’t think about it. But what made you think a dating app can’t make meaningful relationships?

I think not having any access to the workplace communication channel might cause more mental stress. People will end up carrying two phones.

A ride sharing app will be extremely useful imo, especially these days. I live in a small city and many taxi services are closed down already, those who come from outside are heavily dependent on ride sharing apps like uber and lyft. Especially during the weekend nights, people use those services. But yea if you depend on the 3rd party company apps, you need to live by their terms.

I already have a stripped down android phone, but I am heavily into the E-ink display, it’s very comfortable and refreshing. Tried KaiOS devices and they are not that great.

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Yes, I often forget this. One thing I insist on for my own sanity, is that my personal cell phone is personal and not for work matters, but many people can’t. I had to use a cell phone for work in a previous job, so I insisted they provided a separate one. I didn’t want them (or any of our clients) to know my personal cell number. A top priority for me is to be unavailable outside work hours. To me, having access to the workplace communication channel causes mental stress, but unfortunately it does carry the inconvenience of having 2 cell phones during working hours - and some people’s jobs require them to be “on call” all the time.

I think a Mudita-developed app that just accessed the APIs for companies like Uber and Lyft might be a good way to provide this functionality while preserving users’ privacy, but I fear those firms wouldn’t be overly interested in cooperation. As long as the app is truly disabled when not desired, and as long as it has sufficient protection against unnecessary spying/tracking/advertising, I’d be happy. I’d rather go without a feature (or pay more for it) than submit to the surveillance-capitalism model.

I agree! Although I recommend it occasionally, I’m decidedly unimpressed with KaiOS as it’s clunkier and harder to use than a Nokia/Samsung from circa 2001-2008 for similar functionality. Writing SMS messages in particular is truly awful. If e-ink is the most important feature, you might find the Lightphone II very interesting. It has navigation and they have a liftshare-type feature on their “to-do” list. The Punkt MP02 is another good contender (its monochrome display isn’t e-ink but apparently shares many of its benefits). If either had the ability to type an SMS from your computer (preferably via USB cable), I’d have probably already bought it.

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I love the Sunbeam F1 series - when I discovered them, I was ready to order the Daisy then and there, but unfortunately their customer support says the F1 doesn’t currently work on the available cellular bands in Europe.

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