How a text message can trigger craving for a smartphone

Having “minimized” my smartphone in anticipation of receiving my Mudita Pure, I discovered something that can trigger a return to using its browser.

That trigger is a text message from FedEx, UPS, or DHL that a package is on its way – with a “handy” URL to a Web page for more information.

I have learned to read the message without tapping the URL, which Android dutifully converts into a tempting link to the Web page.

I suppose that the MuditaOS will display such URLs as “untappable” links. Meanwhile, I am preparing for this by not tapping those links on my Android cellphone. I simply consume the text message about a delivery and then delete it.

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That’s a good tip to not tap the link for sure and then delete.

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I type them into the desktop’s browser usually.

Ironically the delivery services where it’s just optional to see when the package is arriving exactly have short and neat urls that are easy to type, while the local postal office’s mandatory “you need to pay our fees or you’ll die” urls are like three pages long.

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Interesting point. I will say that I don’t think that there is a way to entirely circumvent the internet in the modern world. But the deterrent of having to physically walk over to your computer (versus having one in your pocket) will be enough for me to drastically limit online use. The times where these things interrupt my life the most are when I’m out of the house/at work/etc.

Curious to hear about other perspectives though!

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I have since switched my UPS alerts from text messages to email messages. Because I no longer use an email app on my cellphone, this switch shifts these non-urgent messages to the appropriate target: my PC.

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Here is an example from two days ago. I planned to meet friends in a parking lot at 6 AM (in the dark) for a half-marathon that started at 7 AM. They found a parking space in that lot at 5:30 AM. I had used my in-car GPS system to navigate from home to that lot. The lot was full when I arrived at 6 AM, so I parked in another lot after driving around for a few minutes.

They text-messaged to me their location as a Google Maps URL. Although I had hidden Google Maps in my dumbed-down Android phone, tapping that link opened it. Google Maps made it easy for me to walk to their car in the dark.

I will not be able to do this with the Mudita Pure. But, as others have written, I could have asked the parking attendants for directions. Plus, I could have called my friends. This experience made me appreciate again how convenient it is to tap a link in a text message. It also reminded me that there are other, more sociable ways to wayfind!

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Interesting tip!

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I’m currently using a Nokia 6230i as I wait for the Pure. One thing that is extremely triggering is when you get a text message from your cellular provider with information that you have received an MMS. It includes a link to check the MMS.

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I believe that @urszula can confirm whether the Mudita Pure will have the ability to respond to a semi-received MMS message with a pre-written-&-stored response (e.g., “Could you please email that to me? Thanks!”).

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Yes. @kirkmahoneyphd is correct, the Mudita Pure has an option to create custom pre-written text message responses, which you can use to quickly reply to a text message.

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